Campfire Classics Podcast

A Literary Comedy podcast where we try to read those books that look good on your shelf…and laugh a lot along the way!

The Baum 2.0 (Season 2, Episode 8)

September 14th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Wow!  This is a weird one.  Our hosts recorded from different timezones!  That's nothing new for most podcasts, but this was an odd experience here at Campfire Classics.

Regardless, this week, our intrepid heroes return to the writing of one Mr. L. Frank Baum.  Last tackled back in January, this episode comes jam packed with new facts about the author and TWO new stories.  That's right folks, it's a two for one deal!  "The Queen of Quok" and "The Girl Who Owned a Bear" all in one sitting! You can't miss that.

Hijinks and shenanigans ensue as Heather tries to carve her way through these two stories.  We learn that that "peg-topping" is not as kinky as it sounds, we hear ALL of heather's voices, and we invent "desecration yoga" (tm).  All in a days work.

"The Queen of Quok" and "The Girl Who Owned a Bear" were both published in American Fairy Tales in 1901.

Promo this week from Ta2squid Podcast.  Check him out, and tell him you want to hear Campfire Classics on his show!

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Now sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Tequila! (Season 2, Episode 7)

September 7th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Neither rain, nor snow, nor too many Margaritas shall keep us from bringing you this show.

And this week, we test a part of that promise.  But which part? I'll bet you can guess!

This week Ken gets to read a loopholed Public Domain story from beloved children's author and apparent psychopath Roald Dahl.  Heather has chosen for Ken a story called "Lamb to the Slaughter," and I have it on good authority that it's not nearly as depressing as that title makes it sound!

It's a twisted web our author weaves.  Unsurprising if you've actually read the horrifying book version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.  And along the way our hosts get some real good work done, like starting a Happy Birthday choir, dashing their own political futures, and asking the age old question "Have you ever seen a sheep nipple?

"Lamb to the Slaughter" was first published in 1953 and has since been adapted into an episode of Alfred Hitchcock presents.  Well Alfred, I guess great minds do think alike.
Research has not discovered a renewal of the copyright on this story.  If you own the copyright, please contact us and we will take all appropriate action after saying only a small handful of snarky things to you.

Promo this week from Hindsight Movie Reviews, a podcast that has Ken actively seeking a guest spot.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Now sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

The Drag Queen Chaperone (Season 2, Episode 6)

August 31st, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Bienvenue, nos amis!  Welcome, our friends!

That's right! This week we're taking a crack at French literature, and Heather gets to swing at that sweet sweet troubling language.

Our story today comes from author Maurice Marie Émile Leblanc, a French writer often compared favorably to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  The story Ken has chosen for Heather is called "The Arrest of Arsène Lupin," and is the first ever appearance of the great gentleman-burglar and detective Arsène Lupin.

It is a fascinating case, but not so fascinating that our hosts stay completely on topic.  To Ken and Heather's credit, their tangents are almost relevant this time 

We have officially entered the Brenaissance Era.
Wine glass symphonies are under utilized.
Don't mount booty in public.

"The Arrest of Arsène Lupin" was first published in 1905 and started nearly 30 years worth of crime and mystery stories.

Promo this week from Boozed and Confused, another couple hosted podcast that delves in to the odd, creepy, and possibly supernatural mysteries in our history.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Now sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Are You Afraid of the Dark? (Season 2, Episode 5)

August 24th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

This week's author is a man who has not only been suspected of actual time travel, but has also been compared to American National Treasure Nick Cage.

Did you get my pun?  National Treasure?

Graham Green (the writer, not the actor from Dances With Wolves) wrote "The End of the Party," and then almost a hundred years later Heather decided Ken should read it.  So he did.  And now you are moments away from listening to that very read.  So in a way, you too are an actor in Dances With Wolves.

As is always the case our hosts do their best to stay on topic, but important things do have a way of derailing them.

What are the rules to Stab Apple?
How bad is inbreeding?
And why are kids so terrible? But really, kids, can't you just be cool?

"The End of the Party" was first published in 1929 and has been reprinted in many anthologies.  Graham Greene considered it one of his best stories.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Now sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Don’t Try This at Home (Season 2, Episode 4)

August 17th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Are you ready for some new bits!? Here comes Science: Just in Case, a new segment of questionable scientific value where Ken explores stupid ways to set things on fire and Heather listens on in abject horror.

The we get to the literature. This week, Heather reads for us another tale from SciFi great H. G. Wells. Ken has chosen a story called "The Truth About Pyecraft". But you could be forgiven for hearing "Pie Craft".  We were definitely hoping for a story about baked goods and witches.

This weeks story comes with an extra little content warning because the narrator is pretty callous and careless about body shaming.  What a dick.

Also, fair warning you will hear:
Stupid things you should not do at home with household items (and when you don't do it, also don't send picture **winky face**).
A very unappetizing tea recipe.
An unpopular opinion about the television program The Office.

"The Truth About Pyecraft" was first published in 1903 in The Strand, which is almost as cool as Highlights for Kids.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Now sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Sex Fly (Season 2, Episode 3)

August 10th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Let's kill Hitler!

Good, now we have your attention! Our story this week was chosen by Heather.  It's another of those strange, more recent stories that managed to slip between the copyright cracks back in the '50s.  Author Mack Reynolds, sometimes known as "Maxine", has a fascinating first in literature related to the Star Trek universe. But, this week's tale, while still SciFi, stays a little closer to home. While Ken reads "Unborn Tomorrow," your hosts run off on the usual tangents and memories form their past.

Which one of our hosts once set themself on fire?
Where would you go to find an orgy?
And why is the government bugging our room?

"Unborn Tomorrow" was first published in Astounding Science Fiction June 1959. Extensive research did not uncover any evidence that the U.S. copyright on this publication was renewed, so if you own the copyright...you screwed up!

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Now sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Eggplants All Night Long (Season 2, Episode 2)

August 3rd, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

This week's piquant tale is a puerile journey of perfidious intimacy bred of propinquity. Also, we learned a lot of new words that we wanted to squeeze into this intro!!

Our story was chosen by Ken from the catalogue of Brazilian Literature.  Author Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, a criminally under appreciated artist in the English speaking world, brought us "The Fortune Teller," a short that will certainly please any fans of the Soap Opera or Telenovela genre.  And really anyone else.  Filled with over the top emotions, and a shocking number of Shakespeare references, this story literally fixed Heather's brain.  Just ask her.

Over the hour-ish long episode, your hosts dive into the writing, but also discuss such topics as:
Who's hot for teacher?
Can nuns run track?
What is the significance of raisins?

"The Fortune Teller" was first published in Portuguese in 1884, and this translation into English was made in 1921.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Now sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Sir Johnny Bangs (Season 2, Episode 1)

July 27th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

It's the season 2 premiere!

Which really means nothing more than we're restarting the episode count because it feels cool.

This week, Heather has selected a story for Ken to read by an author unknown to either of our hosts before this reading.  His name was John Kendrick Bangs, and he might have invented an adult film genre.  Or possibly just ghost story sub-genre.  You know it's hard to tell sometimes.  Regardless, the story is called The Water Ghost of Harrowby Hall: A Victorian Christmas Spirit Story," and Ken gives a pretty good effort at reading it.

Along the way, the hosts ask:
Whose job is it to get things wet?
How would you deal with a ghost?
And who would you curse with perpetual mildew?

"The Water Ghost of Harrowby Hall" was the titular story in the 1894 collection The Water Ghost, and Others.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Now sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 57- Full Service Solicitor

July 20th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Happy anniversary!

We've been doing this for a year! A full trip around the sun! 12 calendar pages! 57 episodes in 365 days.

To celebrate, we're reading a detective story by a woman who is one of the most important writers in the genre.  But no, it's not Agatha.  This week's story, "The Ninescore Mystery", was written by Baroness Emma Orczy, best known today for the stories of The Scarlet Pimpernel.

This story centers on a detective known as Lady Molly and her sidekick Mary. They get up to delightful shenanigans, and along the way your hosts tackle hard hitting issues like accents that melt cheese, the worst Bennet sister, and questionable hair gel.

"The Ninescore Mystery" was first published in the the 1910 collection Lady Molly of Scotland Yard.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

This week's promo is for SpyHards Podcast.  Give them a listen and let us know if they set you to melting and quivering.

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 56- Taco Tuesday

July 13th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Have you had your taco today?

This week, your hosts extend a tentative olive branch to recent Campfire Classics villain Mark Twain as they read the short story that made him famous "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County".  Heather chose this story, and Ken does his best to read it, but it isn't a straight path through.  Along the way your literary companions get distracted by Philadelphia geography, spaying and neutering pets, and beefy tacos.

"The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" was first published in  the November 18, 1865 edition of The New York Saturday Press where it was wildly popular and catapulted Twain into the public eye. It has since been included in several short story collections.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

This week's promo is for Superiority Complex Podcast.  Check them out, and tell them their nerd friends at Campfire Classics sent you.

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 55- Potato Munchin’ Jelly Sack

July 6th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

"It started with a load of potatoes."

What started!? And what did potatoes have to do with it!?

These questions and more will be answered in this week's story "The Thing in the Truck," read by host Heather Michele Lawler and written by Darius John Granger.  Kinda.  Probably. In a manner of speaking.  It's another twisting turning tale from the catalogue of pulp fiction, and is another story in public domain because of one of those legal loopholes Ken has gotten so good at finding.

Other questions discussed this week include:
Who has the best bourbon in Kentucky?
What does a shifting sack sound like?
And am I hungry or horny?

"The Thing in the Truck" was first published in Imagination Science Fiction in 1956.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

This week we are making unsolicited recommendations that you try bourbon from Wilderness Trail, Castle & Key, and Jeptha Creed. And if you go to Jeptha Creed, say hi to Mary.

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 54- Scratch & Sniff Horse Butts

June 29th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

It's a party!!

A Baby Party!!

What? You don't know what a baby party is?  That's okay, neither did your hosts before reading this week's story entitled "The Baby Party" by F. Scott Fitzgerald.  If you're thinking it's a party where someone is going to juggle babies, you're wrong.  Probably.  Maybe.  Actually, we're still not entirely sure on that part.

This week is full of discoveries!  What is the word Ken apparently cannot say?  Who has the best pizza in small town western North Carolina?  And...wait...what was that about juggling babies?  That's a joke, right?

"The Baby Party" was first published in Hearst's International Cosmopolitan, or as it is known today Cosmo Magazine, in February 1925.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

This weeks promo is from It Goes Down in the PM.  Check it out.  It really does go down!

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 53- Worship the Lady Horse-o-Puss

June 22nd, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Some content may not be suitable for children.

Or adults.

Or people with high class standards.

This week, Ken has dug up a story for Heather to read from the catacombs of pulp fiction magazines.  The story is "The Thing on the Roof" by Robert E. Howard.

And folks, this one gets weird.  Like...weird.

Heather discovers her Achilles' Heel is the word "particularly".
Ken very nearly chokes to death because of a flashlight.
And how would you pronounce the word "euhlagiujovff"?

"The Thing on the Roof" was first published in the Weird Tales in 1932, and is only available to us because the author's tragically early death was over 70 years ago.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

This weeks promo is from Twisted and Uncorked.  They'll keep you up at night.  And then we'll put you to sleep. Apparently.

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 52- Screw You Mark Twain

June 15th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Well, this episode comes with a content warning.

Not because it's especially vulgar, just because we decided it's finally time to add one of those.

So, there's the business out of the way.  Now for the fun stuff.

This week's story was selected by Heather and was written by Bret "Not The Hit Man" Harte.  My apologies to anyone who is not a fan of '90s WWF wrestling.  That joke was a little niche.

The story in question, "Tennessee's Partner", is a truly charming and heartfelt story.  So naturally our hosts try to make fun of it.  But despite their best efforts, the story is really what really shines through in this one.

Of course, Heather and Ken still hit many absurd talking points along the way.  What name would you choose for yourself if you could?  Why do some people (Heather) insist on finding clever segues?  And why was Mark Twain such a dick?

"Tennessee's Partner" was first published in the Overland Monthly in 1869, and has been described as "one of the earliest 'buddy' stories in American fiction."

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

This weeks promo is from The insanely Dangerous Retro Podshow .  We may not entirely understand what they're all about.  But damn, we like!!

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 51- Muff Pincher

June 8th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

With 50 episodes in the bag, it felt like time to return to our roots.  So here's another story from our muse, Agatha Christie.

But it's not a Poirot mystery this time.  Oh no, this week Ken is giving Heather a Tommy and Tuppence mystery.  Which means Heather definitely won't have to pull out her questionable French accent. Right?

Well, the adorable detective couple, Tommy and Tuppence, get up to some wild hijinks, and along the way your favorite podcasting couple discuss many of life's little quandaries.  What do you use a Brownie for? How do you practice detective-ing? What would you put in your muff?

"The Affair of the Pink Pearl" is most commonly found in the book Partners in Crime published in 1929, however, it made its first appearance in The Sketch in 1924.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

This weeks promo is from Life Paranormal with V.  Do you have a personal experience with the paranormal?

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 50- Don’t Google That

June 1st, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

We're ringing in June with our 50th episode!

50!

Like, we actually made it to 50 stories...

Okay, 49 stories, since "A Scandal in Bohemia" took up episodes four and five, but you get the point!

And the honor of the author of episode number 50 goes to none other than Oscar Wilde.

Ken gets to read this one, and it is a laugh riot. "The Remarkable Rocket" had our hosts in stitches even when it wasn't making accidental pornographic double entendres. But what else do you expect from one of the greatest comedic linguists in English speaking history.

After Heather reads a bit about Mr. Wilde, we dive into the story, posing some important questions along the way.

What is the most awkward thing you've ever had to google?
Who is the most sensitive person you can think of?
And when did we stop getting two middle names?

"The Remarkable Rocket" was first published in 1888 in The Happy Prince and Other Tales, a collection of five fairytales written by Oscar Wilde.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

This weeks promo is from Malice.  Ariel is incredible in her in depth analysis of the cases she chooses, so definitely, give her a listen.

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 49- A Bodice Ripper

May 25th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Oh my!  This one gets steamy!

That's right, for the first time, Campfire Classics is taking on a romance novel.  And one written by the incomparable Mary Shelley titled simply "The Dream".

This episode runs a touch long because all the heaving bosoms got our hosts a little worked up, but along the way they still manage to tackle the usual array of important world issues. What gives you rage? Who the hell is Dan Apollo? And why aren't there more rock songs about pasta?

"The Dream" was first published in The Keepsake in 1832.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

This weeks promo is from Film Rage. Give them a listen, and tell us what makes you rage.

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 48- Naked Stew

May 18th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

You'll never believe what Heather says to Ken at the end of this episode!!!

That's how clickbait works, right? Annoying headline to get you to click the link?

As long as you're here, you may as well listen to this week's story by French author Guy de Maupassant.  A name which Heather chose and still never managed to pronounce quite right.  But that's okay, the title of the story is blessedly easy to pronounce. "The Necklace".

This story has a surprise ending that would make M. Night Shyamalan jealous (speaking of hard to pronounce names...), but before we reach the end our hosts discuss the sketchiest way to travel, a truly unconventional Project Runway challenge, and dive deep into the best foods to cook naked.

Plus big news is revealed in the beginning, and a listener challenge is set at the end, so listen up for those.

"The Necklace" was first published on 17 February 1884 in the French newspaper Le Gaulois.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

This weeks promo is from Ratchet Book Club. This show is hilarious.  Go check it out. After you've listened to us.

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 47- Lesbian Vampires on Broadway

May 11th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Okay, we may as well be upfront.  This one goes off the rails a bit.  But that's some of the fun!  Right?

Right?

This weeks author is a man with a very cool name, who was recommended to us through social media:  Sheridan Le Fanu.  His story "Dickon the Devil" (hmm...that's two in row Ken has picked with "Devil" in the title) provides the fodder for this weeks ridiculousness.

Amidst the the wacky hijinks, Heather and Ken tackle some hard hitting issues like:
What is your favorite verse to that classic diarrhea song?
What joke made Ken fall for Heather?
What do you look at like a Hand of Glory?

Also, Ken reveals a secret that Heather never knew!  Stick around to the end to find out what.

"Dickon the Devil" was first published in London Society, Christmas Number, 1872. Republished posthumously in the 1923 collection Madam Crowl's Ghost and Other Tales of Mystery, edited by our favorite ghost story author, M. R. James.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

This weeks promo is from The Path Went Chilly.  Check them out for some cold case analysis. 

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 46- No Win Situation

May 4th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

It's May!  It's May!  The lusty month of May!  And this week's episode is full of unexpected musical theatre references.  But that is beside the point.

The point, when we come to it, is reading old stories, and in this episode Heather has chosen a story for Ken to read called "The Phantom Coach" by a fascinating woman named Amelia Edwards.  It's a moody, broody, winter night on the moors kind of tale, so strap in.

But don't worry, it's not all doom and gloom.  As promised, non-sequiturs abound as Ken and Heather discuss hallucinogenic scotch, the origins of Schoolhouse Rock, and 14 year old polyamorous spinsters.

"The Phantom Coach" was first published in 1864.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Another big thank you to Wayne and his podcast Florida Men on Florida Man, for helping make last week far and away our biggest week for listener numbers.  Learn more at www.fmofm.com

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

True Crimes and a Lie, Vol.9

April 30th, 2021

Welcome to True Crimes and a Lie, the gameshow within our podcast where we try to tell the difference between truth and lies.

We're not good at it.

This month's TCaaL comes from Episode 45 of Campfire Classics, and is possibly the most absurd episode we've released yet.

Our guest Wayne joins us from Florida Men on Florida Man, and it is just possible that his Florida based understanding of truly bizarre crimes will give him the edge needed to solve this month's riddle.  You can catch him with his regular crew every week at FMoFM.com.

 
 

Episode 45- Captain B.O.

April 27th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Everyone's favorite gameshow is back, and this time with special guest contestant, Wayne from the podcast Florida Men on Florida Man. With his insider knowledge of strange crimes and bizarre stories, can he help Heather find the lie, or will Ken prove too tricky for them?  Either way, Wayne is a great addition to the True Crimes and a Lie team.  Do not miss it.

Once that craziness wraps up, we move on to our story.  Ken has selected "Daniel and the Devil" by Eugene Field, and Heather gives a fabulous reading which is interrupted by tangents that seem to be 80% more relevant than usual. This will delight many of our regular listeners.  If it disappoints you, don't worry, next week will probably be back the regular amount of non-sequiturs.

This episode introduces such hard hitting issues as:
Who is the hero we deserve?
Is Satan one of our patrons?
and
What are the origins of "dude"?

"Daniel and the Devil" was first published in 1888.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Our guest, Wayne, came to us from Florida Men on Florida Man.  Learn more at www.fmofm.com

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

 
 

Episode 44- Harass ‘em with Butter

April 20th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

What do you get when you mix two quarantined actors, a long dead author, and a bottle of wine?

Well, you're here, so you've probably guessed the answer is: an Episode of Campfire Classics!

This week it's Ken's turn to read, and Heather has selected a story that has been adapted and referenced countless times in television, film, and other media. "The Monkey's Paw" by W. W. Jacobs.  It is a truly classic tale of the macabre.  Along the way, our hosts discuss wine and movie snack pairings, dream up a new crime solving duo, and definitely do not officially condone attacking your enemies with sticks of butter.

"The Monkey's Paw" was first published in England in the collection The Lady of the Barge in 1902.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Promo from Let Me Tell You Somethin', Bitch.  Learn more at letmebitchbitch.com

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 43- Pardonnez Moi!

April 13th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Thanks for coming back!

This week is big one!  The story comes from a classic author so American he was born the same year the USA won its independence (and we'll leave you to decide for yourself how you feel about that).  Washington Irving wrote some of the first American stories and novels that got to be called literature.  This week, Heather is reading "The Adventure of My Uncle", a story from a quirky collection from an even quirkier author.  Listen, we think you'll agree.

Along the way, we cover such topics as drunken twitterpation, the relative safety of strange mansions in the woods, and creepypasta.

Plus, there's a musical callback to a previous episode!

"The Adventure of My Uncle" was first published as part of Tales of a Traveler in 1824.

Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Promo from A Few Bad Apples.  Learn more at podpage.com/a-few-bad-apples/

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 42- Nice Hat, Brah!

April 6th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

It's the first week of April, but we know you're no fool!  How could we possibly know that you ask!?  Because you're here, listening to us.

This week's story comes from a new (to us) author that you probably read in school.  Or you're like Ken and Heather and you didn't.  Either way, Nathaniel Hawthorne is most famous today for having written The Scarlet Letter, but it's his short fiction we're interested in.  Specifically the story "The Minister's Black Veil".

The reading gets underway after some chat about holiday mascots and a brief Fozzie Bear impersonation.  Conversation topics to listen for include rope tugging, open communication, and and the Great Pyramid (scheme) of Literature.

"The Minister's Black Veil"was first published in 1836 in The Token and Atlantic Souvenir. It also appears in Twice-Told Tales, a collection of short stories by Hawthorne published in 1837.

And remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics.

Promo from I Had to Say It.  Learn more at ihadtosayitpodcast.com

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 41- Crotch of Shame

March 30th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

Ken threw a little curve ball this week with some fun facts that have nothing to do with the story. What are those facts about? You'll have to listen to find out.

This week's author is a Campfire Classics regular, SciFi great H.G. Wells.  For facts on him, go check out Episodes 3 and 8.  The story is "The Red Room," and Heather's reading is strangely reminiscent of an episode of Frasier.  Along the way, our hosts eschew their traditional sex jokes in favor of a much more high brow style of humor: farts and pee. 

Discussion topics not related to bodily functions include Chekhov's gun, magic fog trees, and geriatric West Side Story.

"The Red Room" was first published in The Idler magazine, in March 1896.

If you patronize us on Patreon you could be the one to put us over our March goal and earn a Campfire Classics Calendar.

Promo from Thanks I Hate It.  Learn more at tihipodcast.com

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

True Crimes and a Lie, Vol. 8

March 26th, 2021

Welcome to True Crimes and a Lie, the gameshow within our podcast where we try to tell the difference between truth and lies.

We're not good at it.

This month's TCaaL comes from Episode 40 of Campfire Classics, and is full of bizarre twists and turns.

Our guest, Kevin, joins us from The Jury Room.  You can listen to him dissect true crime, conspiracies, and cults at JuryRoomPodcast.com, but will he be able to help heather discern fact from fiction?

Episode 40- Look at my Specimen Rod

March 23rd, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

We're back with another story, three more crimes (one of them a lie), and a whole lot of juvenile banter.

This week is March's "True Crimes and a Lie," but it is also our first story from one of the great American writers, Herman Melville.  This story was specially selected by Heather for Ken to read specifically because of its title, "The Lightning-Rod Man."  It is a wild ride with a couple of dramatic characters and a shocking number of jokes about the male reproductive organ.  Or maybe that's just our hosts reading something into it that wasn't there.

Regardless, it is a fantastic story, and along the way our hosts discuss the Great White Dick, green glass balls, and...yeah, it really is mostly euphemisms.  Though there is also a surprising amount of geography.

"The Lightning-Rod Man" was first published in Putnam's Monthly Magazine, August 1854, and despite being one of Melville's lesser known stories is a literary gem.

Kevin from The Jury Room guest as he tries his hand at "True Crimes and a Lie."  He's a great guest, but more importantly a great host of his own podcast, so check him out at JuryRoomPodcast.com 

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 39- The Dead Travel Fast

March 16th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

If it's Tuesday it must be...Munich?

This week, you'll be delighted to learn that Heather is going to attempt her German accent again.  Do you think it will be better than last time?  You'll have to listen to find out.  The story is from horror legend Bram Stoker, and in fact was first written to be part of his most famous book Dracula.  The story is called "Dracula's Guest".

As we work through the story, we address some important issues.  Like the value of theatre critics, what is the best transition music, and dyslexia 2.0.

"Dracula's Guest" was first published in 1914, 2 years after Stoker's death, as part of the collection Dracula's Guest and Other Weird StoriesBut today, we're reading it out of the book Classic Horror Tales sent to us from Foggy Pine Books.  Visit them at www.foggypinebooks.com.

Promo: Breaking Down Bad Books (Host Nathan also recommended this week's story, so double shout out, please go support him)
https://shows.acast.com/breaking-down 

And you can go hear Ken and Heather interviewed in the March 16th episode of Figure it Out with Julia Johnson.

https://www.podbean.com/podcast-detail/733vg-12af24/Figure-it-out-Podcast

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Episode 38- Cuckoo in the Bean

March 9th, 2021

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!!

As we near the 1 year mark of being quarantined from the world, let's look back at all the marvelous...

Nah, never mind, how about we just read another story.

This week, Ken gets to read an odd little story by the apparently famous (though we'd never heard of him) Ring Lardner.  "Haircut" is a charming, folksy, storyteller-y short story with more suspicious character crammed into 8 pages than you can shake a stick at (or some other olde timey idiom).

Along the way, Ken and Heather talk Music Man re-writes, grave robbing vengeance, and (stick around until the end) a Campfire Classics animal costume calendar.  

"Haircut" was first published  in 1925, and is his most republished and anthologized story.

Promo: Stolen From Me By Linsey
https://www.stolenfrommepod.com/

And, if you can't wait for more of Ken's voice, head over to Plum Forest Podcast and listen to hime in episode 31, The River Rock
https://www.plumforestpodcast.com/

So sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

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